Stoner

“In his forty-third year William Stoner learned what others, much younger, had learned before him: that the person one loves at first is not the person one loves at last, and that love is not an end but a process through which one person attempts to know another. […] In his extreme youth Stoner had thought of love as an absolute state of being to which, if one were lucky, one might find access; in his maturity he had decided it was the heaven of a false religion, toward which one ought to gaze with an amused disbelief, a gently familiar contempt, and an embarrassed nostalgia. Now in his middle age he began to know that it was neither a state of grace nor an illusion; he saw it as a human act of becoming, a condition that was invented and modified moment by moment and day by day, by the will and the intelligence and the heart.”
(pages 194, 195)

Subject headings associated with the quotation

1. Love.

Bibliographic Description

Williams, John, 1922-1994, author
Text (visual) : unmediated
Stoner : A Novel / John Williams. — London : Allen Lane, 1973.
278 pages ; 21 cm.
ISBN 0713904666

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *